Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars

Papers, Presentations, and Posters

2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


2016

UW Educator Workshop Series: Improving Professional Learning
June 23, 2016

Assistant Researcher Julia Nelson Savoy gave a webinar presentation on the “Proficiency Theory” of adult learning and the ways this theory can be used to guide learner self-assessment. This workshop series is open to UW-Madison faculty and staff who are interested in adult learning theory and faculty development. More information on this workshop can be found here.

Presentation slides

The Impact of Teaching Development Programs on STEM Doctoral Students: Findings and Recommendations
Mark Connolly

LSFSS PI Mark Connolly gave an invited presentation at the CIRTL Network Forum. For more information about the presentation, click here.

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars
Mark Connolly, You-Geon Lee, Julia Savoy, & Lucas Hill

To address the lack of information about doctoral teaching development (TD) programs, the Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars (LSFSS)—a seven-year, multi institutional study—identified the short and long-term effects of TD programs on STEM doctoral students’ teaching-related skills, knowledge, attitudes, and career choices.

This research was presented by LSFSS Associate Researcher You-Geon Lee at the symposium on “Envisioning the Future of Undergraduate STEM Education (EnFUSE): Research and Practice” in April of 2016, hosted by the National Science Foundation and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. More information about this symposium can be found here.

Poster

How to Build a Better Future STEM Faculty
Mark Connolly, Julia N. Savoy, and You-Geon Lee

WCER Lunch and Learn Series, March 7, 2016 
Connolly, Savoy, and Lee reviewed the findings of their seven-year study, which explored the impact of doctoral teaching development on early-career faculty members’ teaching-related knowledge, skills, attitudes, and career choices. They offered recommendations for increasing doctoral student engagement in teaching development programs and activities to stakeholders at the national, institutional, departmental, and individual levels.
 
Handout: Building a Better Future STEM Faculty: Executive Summary

2015

The Effects of Doctoral Teaching Development on Early-career STEM Scholars’ College Teaching Self-efficacy
Mark R. Connolly, You-Geon Lee, and Julia N. Savoy

The Review of Higher Education (under review)

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars: Findings about University of Wisconsin-Madison Doctoral Students
Mark Connolly, Julia Savoy, You-Geon Lee, and Lucas Hill
University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School Plenary Session: June 2015

Connolly, Savoy, and Lee shared an overview of the LSFSS study and specific findings about doctoral students from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in an invited presentation to the deans of the Graduate School. 

Handout: Impact of Professional Development Programs on Future STEM Faculty: A Longitudinal Mixed-Methods Study

Faculty Hiring and Tenure by Sex and Race: New Evidence from a National Survey
Mark R. Connolly, You-Geon Lee, and Julia N. Savoy
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: April 2015

In academic science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), the U.S. professoriate remains disproportionately White and male, despite decades of effort to make hiring and tenure processes more just. To examine the likelihood of a doctorate recipient first obtaining a tenure-track position and then receiving tenure and to investigate the effects of sex and race, we analyzed data from the Survey of Doctorate Recipients collected between 1993-2010 (n = 31,370), employing two separate discrete time event history models via logistic regression. In obtaining a tenure-track position, Black and Hispanic doctorate recipients were hired faster than were White doctorates, and Asian doctorate recipients were hired later than White doctorates. Single men and women with a child under six were least likely to be hired. In receiving tenure, Black assistant professors and women assistant professors with a child under six were each at a significant disadvantage.

The Effects of Doctoral Teaching Development on Early-career STEM Scholar’s College-teaching Self-efficacy
Mark R. Connolly, You-Geon Lee, and Julia Nelson Savoy
Working Paper Series (WP-2015-01): March 2015

As a result of increased national emphasis on preparing future faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to teach undergraduates, more research universities offer teaching development (TD) programs to doctoral students who aspire to academic careers. Using social cognitive career theory, we examine the effects of these programs on early-career STEM scholars' sense of self-efficacy as postsecondary teachers. In 2011, a survey questionnaire was administered to 2,156 people who in 2009 were doctoral students in STEM departments at three U.S. research universities; 1,445 responded (67%). Regression analysis revealed positive relationships between participation in TD and participants' college teaching self-efficacy, and positive interaction effects for women STEM doctoral students. The paper discusses implications for doctoral students, faculty advisors, and TD programs. Full text.

Facilitating Teaching-focused Professional Development among Postdocs (90-minute facilitated workshop)
Mark R. Connolly, L. Hill, You-Geon Lee, Julia N. Savoy
Annual Meeting of the National Postdoctoral Association: March 2015

Many STEM postdocs hope for full-time faculty work. However, most postdocs are not prepared for the full range of academic work, including teaching responsibilities. Because their positions focus on research productivity, postdocs have few opportunities to develop teaching skills. Although some future faculty engage in college teaching during graduate school, many postdocs still seek teaching development (TD) opportunities, either because they did not participate during graduate school or because applications for faculty positions require teaching experience. The outlook for postdocs who wish to become tenure-track (TT) faculty is grim. In 2006, less than 15 percent of biosciences doctorate recipients held a tenure-track position within six years of earning their doctoral degree. As research funding dries up, the odds of landing a TT position shrinks, leaving many postdocs who are unable to find a faculty job trapped in serial postdoc placements. For those looking to escape “postdoc purgatory,” TD programs help them gain skills, knowledge, and social connections that may expand their employment options.

In light of the barriers to TD that postdocs face, the goals of this session were to (1) examine findings from a longitudinal study of the short- and long-term effects of TD on STEM doctorate recipients (many of whom are now postdocs); and (2) provide self-assessment tools useful to both postdocs and those who support their TD.

The session reviewed a longitudinal study that tracked a panel of late-stage STEM doctoral students (initial N ~ 3,000) through three surveys over five years (2009, ’11, ‘13) as they moved from graduate education to employment; present findings about doctoral students who moved into postdoc positions, including teaching activities, participation in TD, and confidence in their teaching; and shared self-assessment tools adapted from instruments developed for the study. These resources allow postdocs seeking self-improvement and programmers providing targeted development experiences to assess their use of evidence-based teaching strategies, and are accompanied by summary data and reference guides. Because successful postdoc appointments are characterized by meaningful professional development, including training in teaching skills, this session will provide participants with knowledge and tools that will advance the next generation of STEM scholars.

Presentation
Study Overview Handout
Interactive Question Handout
Self-Assessment Tool

2014

Preparing the Future STEM Faculty of the Nation: Research Findings from CIRTL
Robert R. Mathieu, Mark R. Connolly, and Christine Pfund
Wisconsin Center for Education Research 50th Anniversary Symposium, University of Wisconsin–Madison: November 2014

In support of Mathieu’s presentation on the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning, Connolly presented national data from the Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars.

Postsecondary Teaching, Doctoral Training, and “Women’s Work” in STEM Fields: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Gendered Experiences in Teaching Development Programs
Ross J. Benbow, You-Geon Lee, and Mark R. Connolly
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: April 2014

Drawing on scholarship showing women to be underrepresented among STEM PhDs but often overrepresented in lower-status teaching activities, this mixed methods study addressed two research questions: (1) Do women doctoral students participate in teaching development (TD) activities at higher levels than their male counterparts? (2) What do women’s TD experiences, and their perceptions of the status of teaching activities during their doctoral studies, tell us about these participation rates as well as gendered divisions of labor in postsecondary instruction? Survey data showed that across three research universities, women reported engaging in TD programs at higher levels than men. A case study analysis of two women participants found that TD activities spoke not only to their burgeoning identities as teacher scholars, but also to their desire to foster connections, both interpersonal and interdisciplinary, outside the confines of their departments.

The Effects of Doctoral Teaching Development Programs on STEM Doctoral Students’ College Teaching Competency
Mark R. Connolly and You-Geon Lee
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: April 2014

As a result of increased national emphasis on preparing future faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) to teach undergraduates, more research universities are offering teaching development (TD) programs to doctoral students who aspire to academic careers. Using social cognitive career theory, we examine the effects of TD programs on early-career STEM scholars’ sense of self-efficacy as postsecondary teachers. In 2011, a survey questionnaire was administered to 2,156 people who in 2009 were doctoral students in STEM departments at three U.S. research universities; 1,445 responded (67%). Regression analysis revealed positive relationships between participation in TD and participants’ college-teaching self-efficacy, and positive interaction effects for women STEM doctoral students. Implications for doctoral students, faculty advisors, and TD programs are discussed.

Influences on STEM Doctoral Students’ Participation in Teaching Development Programs 
Mark R. Connolly, You-Geon Lee, and Ann E. Austin
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: April 2014

To better understand STEM doctoral students' participation in learning experiences focused on preparing college teachers, the present study addresses these three research questions: (1) Why did doctoral students decide to participate in TD programs? (2) What factors discouraged their participation? (3) To what extent did gender and field of study affect their reasons for participating in TD programs? This study shows that a majority of STEM doctoral students participate in actual teaching experiences during their doctoral training. It also shows that most STEM doctoral students participate in some form of teaching development during their doctoral training, sometimes because it is required. It also finds noteworthy differences in participation between male and female doctoral students.

2013

Why Take the Risk? Exploring the Role that Teaching Development Plays in STEM Doctoral Education
Ross J. Benbow and Mark R. Connolly
Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education: October 2013

As a way of improving undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), teaching development programs (TD) are offered to better train doctoral students as college teachers and improve the undergraduate learning experience. This phenomenological study examined former STEM doctoral students’ reasons for participating in TD at three research universities, despite a number of reported constraints in many departments. Interviews with 65 doctorate recipients suggest that participating in TD activities proved to be a useful way of realigning students’ expectations, experiences, and career opportunities in the pursuit of educational goals.

Early Career Researchers Navigating the Future: ‘Taking Stock’ of Twenty Years of Research
Ann E. Austin, Mark R. Connolly, David F. Feldon, and Lynn McAlpine
Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education: October 2013

Given the substantial body of research into doctoral education and the transition into early careers of the past 20 years, the purpose of this session was to ‘take stock’: to consider gaps in our knowledge, limitations in our research practices, and shortcomings in our preferred epistemologies. The session brought together a panel of scholars recognized for their research on aspects of doctoral education and the transition into early careers. The session drew on their perspectives on the key research findings from the research over the past two decades, as well as their collective experience with a range of epistemological approaches and different research methods, including longitudinal and other less traditional approaches.

Preparing to Teach: The Impact of CIRTL’s Professional Development Programs on Future Faculty
Ann E. Austin, Mark R. Connolly, Christine Pfund, and L. J. Shelton
Annual Meeting of the American Education Research Association: May 2013

The Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL) is a major national initiative, currently involving 25 universities, with the goal of affecting the national landscape in doctoral education by developing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating strategies for professional development that prepare STEM future faculty to be the knowledgeable, dedicated, and effective university and college teachers needed today. Guided by the Stufflebeam CIPP model, this paper draws upon research and evaluation studies conducted by CIRTL to examine the impact of teaching-focused professional development on doctoral students in STEM fields.

The Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Scholars: Examining the Impact of Graduate Teaching Development Programs on Academic Careers
Mark R. Connolly, You-Geon Lee, Ross J. Benbow, and Derria Byrd
TUES/CCLI Annual Principal Investigators Meeting: January 2013

How does participation in teaching-focused professional development affect STEM doctoral students’ teaching preparation, teaching self-confidence, career pathways, and early-career performance? This study utilized surveys and interviews to follow a panel of 3,060 late-stage doctoral students from three research universities for six years. Findings demonstrate that doctoral students who participated in teaching development gained and thereafter applied knowledge and skills known to improve student learning; in addition, new Ph.D.’s reported that their teaching development experience allowed them to clarify their career options and successfully compete for a wider variety of jobs.

Poster

2012

Advancing STEM Undergraduate Learning: Preparing the Nation's Future Faculty
Christine Pfund, Robert Mathieu, Ann Austin, Mark R. Connolly, Brian Manske, and Katie Moore
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning, 44, 64-72. 2012.

Graduate students and post-doctoral scholars at research universities will shape the future of undergraduate education in the natural and social sciences, technology, engineering, and mathematics (the STEM disciplines) in the United States. Since almost 80 percent of doctoral students are trained at only 100 research universities, the graduate schools of these institutions are a critical leverage point for improving undergraduate STEM education across the country. If a significant fraction of these universities were to intentionally prepare future STEM faculty as teachers of undergraduates, they would seed the diverse array of undergraduate institutions across the country with thousands of faculty and instructional staff who both teach effectively and continually improve the teaching-learning process. Here we share the story of the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL), its conceptual framework for the preparation of future faculty, and one example of a high-impact implementation: the Delta Program in Research, Teaching and Learning (Delta) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Exploring the Role of Teaching Development Activities on Faculty/Academic Career Formation
Ross J. Benbow and Mark R. Connolly
Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education: November 2012

Our study explores three main questions: (1) What do early-career academics report as their reasons for participating in teaching development (TD) during their doctoral training? (2) How, if at all, do respondents believe TD influence their early career expectations? (3) How do their experiences speak to the reported mismatch between expectations, doctoral training, and post-PhD employment? We find that TD programs can help participants with “realigning” expectations, experiences, and opportunities. However, the three-way mismatch still exists, and we cannot say that realignment necessarily leads to better jobs or greater job satisfaction.  

Exploring the Effects of Teaching Development Programs on Early-career STEM Scholars' Self-efficacy for Undergraduate Teaching
Mark R. Connolly and You-Geon Lee
Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education: November 2012

Intentional preparation of future faculty as undergraduate educations has become a higher priority in the national STEM agenda. Our study explores the following research questions: (1) To what extent does any kind of participation in teaching development (TD) affect teaching efficacy beliefs? (2) Does degree of engagement in TD affect teaching efficacy beliefs? and (3) Do effects of TD interact with gender and race? We find that participation in teaching development contributes to greater self-efficacy for teaching undergraduates. In addition, self-efficacy varies with engagement; more time in TD contributes to greater confidence. Women doctoral students start with less confidence, but catch up through TD participation, especially at high levels. Finally, actual teaching experience makes a separate and significant contribution.

Examining the Formation of STEM Doctoral Students as Postsecondary Teachers
Mark R. Connolly
Annual Meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education: October 2012

Connolly presented interview-based findings from longitudinal research on the effects on science and engineering graduate students and postdocs (faculty-in-training) of a pedagogical professional development program at a research university.  Findings presented included interviewee motivations for program participation, and program impact on participants’ knowledge, skills, attitudes and confidence regarding pedagogical issues and their future professional plans.  Session attendees participated in dialogue about how these findings inform their own professional development initiatives and what their institutions are looking for in new faculty; and gained insight into the value of longitudinal research for determining lasting impact of professional development on faculty-in-training.

CIRTL: A Multi-institutional Network’s Approach to Preparing Future Scholars
Ann E. Austin, Laura L. B. Border, Derek Bruff, Mark R. Connolly, D. Gillian-Daniel, Robin Greenler, and Mary Deanne Sorcinelli
Annual Meeting of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education: October 2012

As a major national NSF-sponsored project focused especially on STEM doctoral student development that now has an 8-year history as well as an extensive record of research, the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching & Learning (CIRTL) provides a case study for examining key issues concerning institutional and national approaches to preparing future faculty and scholars. Drawing on experiences and research-based findings from the CIRTL initiative, this session will identify lessons learned from CIRTL about effective approaches to doctoral student professional development and explore the implications for teaching and learning centers.

From the Conference to the Campus: Educational Development through the Lens of Crowdsourcing
Derek Bruff, Judy Brophy, Amy Collier, Mark R. Connolly, Jim Julius, Rachel Niemer, Jennifer Russell, and Jose Vasquez Cognet
Plenary address presented at the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education, Seattle, WA: October 2012

View the presentation here.

2011

Steps Toward a Framework for an Intended Curriculum for Graduate and Professional Students: How We Talk about What We Do
Alan Kalish, S. Spencer Robinson, Laura Border, Elizabeth Chandler, Mark R. Connolly, Lynn Jones Eaton, Joanna Gilmore, Lauren Griffith, Steve Hanson, Tershia Pinder-Grover, and Linda von Hoene       
Studies in graduate and professional student development, 14, 163-173. Stillwater, OK: New Forums. 2011.

Helping Future Faculty “Come Out” as Teachers
Mark R. Connolly
Essays on Teaching Excellence, Vol. 22, No. 6. 2011.

View the essay here.

The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study of Doctoral and Postdoctoral Teaching Development: Key Findings
Ross J. Benbow, Derria Byrd, and Mark R. Connolly
Report: November 2011

The purpose of this document is to report the study’s findings to key leaders and stakeholders involved in teaching development for STEM trainees at the UW-Madison. Findings will help leaders and administrators reflect on teaching development programming as they move forward with project expansion. The findings from this study also will be of special interest to graduate students, faculty advisors, graduate-school administrators, heads of faculty development programs, and scholars interested in improving STEM education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The report is organized into 13 sections. After our overview, the first section details the study’s research design. The second section reports on respondents’ degree completion and post-training placement, while the third describes respondents’ teaching development experiences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Section 4 describes respondents’ motivations for and impediments to participating in teaching development, and 5 outlines respondents’ reported satisfaction with their teaching development programs and experiences. The sixth, seventh, eighth, and ninth sections detail, in order, respondents’ reported social, behavioral, affective, and cognitive gains from teaching development. Section 10 outlines respondents’ application of the knowledge and skills they gained in teaching development, 11 describes how respondents believed teaching development influenced their job searches and career-seeking, and 12 reports on respondents’ career satisfaction. The 13th section analyzes respondents’ self-reported career trajectories and future plans, while the 14th and final section wraps up with important highlights from the study and discussion moving forward.

The Preparation of STEM Future Faculty through Teaching-as-Research
Robert M. Mathieu, Don Gillian-Daniel, and Mark R. Connolly
Annual Meeting of the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: October 2011

This panel session reported on a 9-yr experiment in the use of a SOTL-like concept to integrate STEM future faculty preparation in teaching and learning into the graduate education of a major research university, the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The session presented the foundational ideas, the theoretical framework, the implementation strategies, evaluation outcomes and evidence for institutional change toward SOTL. The panel provided the voices of key participants in that institutional change – graduate students, faculty and staff, evaluators, and administrators.

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Faculty: Findings from Years 1 & 2
Mark R. Connolly, Shihmei S. Barger, and J. Edward Connery
Symposium Presented by the LSFSS Staff: June 2011

During the first two years of this six-year study, our research team has analyzed data from surveys and interviews that address these three research questions:
1.  What are the various kinds of teaching development programs for STEM graduate students?
2.  What aspects or features should be considered in their design and evaluation of teaching development programs?
3.  What do STEM doctoral students gain from teaching development programs that helps prepare them for a diverse range of academic careers?

We invited UW–Madison staff and faculty who were interested in graduate student professional development and improving undergraduate STEM education to learn more about our study. We will not only described the study’s aims and present findings, but encouraged participants to critically review our work, consider its implications for practice, and discuss what the study might explore over the next three years.

Examining the Effects of Teaching Assistantships and Future Faculty Programs on Doctoral Students’ Gains in Academic Competencies
Mark R. Connolly, Shihmei S. Barger, and J. Edward Connery
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: April 2011

Traditionally, graduate teaching assistantships have been the primary vehicle for gaining teaching experience in preparation for a faculty career. However, in recent decades, teaching-focused professional development programs have emerged as an additional means of teaching preparation. Using survey data from 2098 late-stage doctoral students, we address the question of how these two forms of teaching preparation correspond to self-reported gains on key measures of pedagogical knowledge and skills. Relying on a complementary professional development framework, we find that a combination of actual teaching experience (ATE) and teaching-focused professional development (TFPD) is associated with the greatest gains in knowledge and skills. We then offer recommendations for policy and practice as well as implications for further study.

Exploring the Impact of Teaching-focused Professional Development on Academic Careers of STEM Ph.D.s
Mark R. Connolly
Fourth International CETL Conference: April 2011

This session will examine early findings from the Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Faculty, a five-year project that is following a panel of 3,000+ late-stage doctoral students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs at three US research universities through degree completion and into academic careers. Specifically, this mixed-methods study is investigating the short- and long-term effects of “future faculty” programs that aim to prepare doctoral students to teach. Key findings from the study’s Year 1 survey include (1) what participants gained from teaching-focused professional development (TFPD); (2) changes in interest in an academic career; and (3) actual career choices of newly completed PhDs. The session will also offer early findings from Year 2 interviews about how early-career faculty and academic staff (“facademics”) are now applying what they learned from TFPD. The latter half of the session will be reserved for discussion.

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Faculty
Mark R. Connolly, Shihmei S. Barger, J. Edward Connery, and Ann E. Austin
TUES/CCLI Annual Principal Investigators Meeting: January 2011

This study explores the short- and long-term impact of teaching-focused professional development (TFPD) on STEM doctoral students interested in becoming postsecondary faculty. It utilizes surveys and interviews to follow a panel of 3,000 late-stage doctoral students from three research universities for five years. We find that eighty percent of respondents had a definite (55%) or possible (25%) interest in a faculty position, with men generally more certain in their interest than women. Among these potential STEM faculty, more than 90% reported some form of teaching preparation; 78% had actual teaching experience and 76% had participated in one or more TFPD activities. However, nearly 8% reported having zero preparation or experience in teaching.

Poster

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Faculty: Study Overview
Mark R. Connolly and Ross J. Benbow
Presentation CIRTL Network: January 2011

Over the past decade, significant time and resources have been invested in developing teaching development programs (TPD) to supplement traditional doctoral training at research universities. However, little is known about the effectiveness of these programs. Building on prior research supported by the Center for the Integration of Research, Teaching, and Learning (CIRTL), our five-year, multi-institutional study is examining the short- and long-term effects of teaching development programs on STEM doctoral students and their early-career performance. This longitudinal study is following a panel of late-stage STEM doctoral students (initial N = 3060) from three institutions: Arizona State University, the University of Washington-Seattle, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This population of STEM “dissertators,” which includes both TPD participants and nonparticipants, was surveyed in Years One (2009, n = 2098; 71% response rate) and Three (2011; 64%). A subsample of this group—76 TPD participants who completed their doctorate and are now working in a postsecondary setting—have just been interviewed and will be again in two years.

Benbow and Connolly also presented findings from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (Benbow, Byrd, & Connolly, 2011).

2010

Future-faculty Professional Development Programs for Doctoral Students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: An Exploratory Classification Scheme
Mark R. Connolly, Julia N. Savoy, and Shihmei S. Barger
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: May 2010

We present an exploratory classification scheme for describing future-faculty professional development (FFPD) programs in US universities and colleges. This work addresses the first key research question of a 5-year, multi-institutional study of the short- and long-term effects of FFPD programs on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) doctoral students and their early-career performance. Building on a previous framework of future-faculty initiatives, we offer a classification scheme with eight categories: focus, scope, longevity, funding, duration, format, selectivity, and audience. Limitations of this framework and plans for its revision are presented. The article also discusses the value of drawing upon research on K-12 teacher professional development to help address the urgent need for models that better inform professional development for faculty and future faculty. 

A Model of Highly Effective Teaching-focused Doctoral Student Professional Development Programs
Mark R. Connolly, Julia N. Savoy, and Shihmei S. Barger
Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association: May 2010

We propose a comprehensive, conceptual model of effective, teaching-focused professional development programs (“TFPD”). In addition to identifying and describing these programs’ five dimensions—Content, Process, Context, People, and Outcome—we highlight core issues in doctoral student professional development, offer a conceptual framework to those interested in designing, implementing, evaluating, or researching doctoral student professional development programs, describe the features of effective teaching-focused professional development programs, and provide a rubric for assessing the quality and effectiveness of professional development efforts.

Academic Careers: Where are Grads Going and Why?
Mark R. Connolly
Guest presenter for CIRTL Coffee Hour series, University of Wisconsin–Madison: April 2010

Visit the CIRTL Coffee Hour archive here.

Longitudinal Study of Future STEM Faculty: Preliminary Findings from Year 1
Mark R. Connolly
Delta Program for Research, Teaching, and Learning: February 2010

Connolly presented initial findings from the first year of the LSFSS to administrators and participants of the Delta Program for Research, Teaching, and Learning at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

2009

Future-faculty Professional Development: Why It’s More Important than Ever
Mark R. Connolly (2009, April).
Keynote Address to Graduate Teaching Academy Banquet, Texas A&M University: April 2009

Effects of Teaching-Focused Professional Development on STEM Doctoral Students and Postdocs: Findings from a Longitudinal Study
Mark R. Connolly, Julia N. Savoy, and Shihmei S. Barger
Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Higher Education: November 2009

Connolly presented a poster on behalf of the LSFSS team.

2008

Investigating Learning in the Doctorate: Notes Towards a Transnational Research Agenda
Mark R. Connolly, Dan Kaczynski, Alison Lee, and Vijay Kumar Mallan
In M. Kiley & G. Mullins (Eds.), Quality in Postgraduate Research: Research Education in the New Global Environment (p. 187). 2008.

This paper takes as its point of departure two questions: How can the place of learning as a key element of doctoral education be better understood? How does it fit in relation to research and to supervision? The authors’ aims are to develop empirical ‘country’ studies of the environments for doctoral learning. While there is now a great deal of work on doctoral supervision, there is relatively little research on student learning. Work referring to students is often couched in terms of the ‘doctoral student experience’, which may or may not provide a useful lens on the questions of learning that concern this group (e.g., Leonard et al., 2006). As noted by Green (2005), what remains largely uncharted territory in conceptual terms is the set of questions in the space opened by Burton Clark’s (1994) idea of the ‘unity’ among research, teaching and study, which lies at the academic ‘heartland’ of the modern research university.

 

Mobilizing STEM Education for a Sustainable Future